EAPS Department Lecture Series - Brad Marston (Brown University)

Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Building 54, 915/923
21 AMES ST, Cambridge, MA 02139

El Niño as a Topological Insulator: A Surprising Connection Between Climate, and Quantum, Physics

Symmetries and topology play central roles in our understanding of physics. Topology, for instance, explains the precise quantization of the Hall effect and the protection of surface states in topological insulators against scattering from disorder or bumps. However discrete symmetries and topology have so far played little role in thinking about the fluid dynamics of oceans and atmospheres. In this talk I show that, as a consequence of the rotation of the Earth that breaks time reversal symmetry, equatorially trapped Kelvin and Yanai waves emerge as topologically protected edge modes. Thus the oceans and atmosphere of Earth naturally share basic physics with topological insulators. As equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in the Pacific ocean are an important component of El Niño Southern Oscillation and other climate processes, these new results demonstrate that topology plays a surprising role in Earth’s climate system. [See Science 358, 1075 (2017).]

About this Series

Weekly talks given by leading thinkers in the areas of geology, geophysics, geobiology, geochemistry, atmospheric science, oceanography, climatology, and planetary science. Lectures take place on Wednesdays from 3:45pm in MIT Building 54 room 915, unless otherwise noted.

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Conferences/Seminars/Lectures

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Academic

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MIT Community

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School of Science

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EAPS DLS

Department
Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences
Contact Email

bmilardo@mit.edu

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